6 Ways to Boost Your Immune System

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The immune system constitutes a network of cells, tissues, and organs that, altogether, defend your body against disease-causing microorganisms. This is done through what is called immune response, or when the components of the immune system recognise and duly respond to the antigens (foreign substances) invading your body.

But no singular person’s immune system can run at full power 100% of the time. We are all built differently and undergo different circumstances in life, and those factor into the efficacy of our immune systems. Some key influences to our immune systems are our age, diet, lifestyle, and rate of exposure to germ-infested environments. Likewise, problems that indicate weakness in the immune system are varied, and can encompass prolonged bouts of sickness, digestive issues, blood issues like anaemia, and more.

There is still much to know about how immunity works, as scientists must study immune response vis-à-vis the whole system as opposed to its individual components. Nevertheless, modern medicine and health scholarship have picked up on some important behavioural relationships to immune response—such as better nutritional intake, better hygiene, and vigilance in times of exposure.

Want to know how to achieve better immunity? Seeking to guard yourself against the spread of disease? Here are some practical tips to boosting your immune system.

  1. Get assessed for your health condition. Again, everyone’s bodily constitutions are different. One philosophy for boosting immunity may not work for you as well as it does for someone else. Your point of reference should be your individual health situation, i.e. the record you’ll keep from your personal physician. Seek out advice on what deficiencies you might possess, what types of sickness you might be vulnerable to, and what medicines to take in order to keep you at the peak of health. You may also want to learn first aid in a training course in Sydney or in your Aussie locality so that you can properly deal with any consequences of an immunity problem, such as allergies or asthma.

  2. Enjoy a healthy diet. Food is medicine, as the saying goes. Certain foods go a long way in boosting immunity, and are worth incorporating into your regular diet. Some good examples are citrus fruits (containing Vitamin C, which increases the production of white blood cells and thus counters infection); broccoli (chock-full of fibre, antioxidants, and Vitamins A, C, and E); garlic (helps lower blood pressure); and yoghurt (containing good bacteria that stimulate the immune system). If your doctor also judges you to have a certain vitamin deficiency, then you can also supplement your diet with multivitamins.

  3. Exercise. Regular physical activity instigates better health in myriad ways, such as by lowering blood pressure, maintaining a viable body weight, and bettering the condition of one’s cardiovascular system. But recent studies have also focused on the role of exercise to immune response. One insight courtesy of Harvard Health Publishing is that exercise promotes free and efficient circulation of cells with the immune system. As with all things, however, exercise comes with its own precautions. When you exercise, you should ensure that you are in good enough condition to strain your body, and you should be extra careful not to overexert.

  4. Maintain a healthy sleep regimen. Do you notice that many people who lack sleep seem more vulnerable to getting sick? That should illustrate the close relationship that healthy sleep has to one’s immune system. The average adult will need at least 7 to 8 hours a night of full, uninterrupted rest in order to achieve “restorative sleep,” which keeps the body in fighting form. On your part, try to eliminate all barriers to a good night’s sleep—such as overwork or a distracting environment—and let your body’s immune system recover from its daily stresses.  

  5. Practice good hygiene. Hygiene is crucial in keeping disease-causing microorganisms at bay. The good thing is that it is relatively easy to practice good hygiene if one is mindful. Don’t forget to wash your hands regularly with soap and water, especially in public places where germs are rife (such as hospitals). You may also want to make a regular habit out of disinfecting surfaces in your home.

  6. Be extra careful when in contact with others who are sick. If you’re visiting someone sick in their home or in the hospital, take all the necessary precautions to ensure that the infection won’t spread. Observe visiting hours and wear a protective face mask. In addition, you should only visit if you are confident that you’re in good health; if that’s not the case, then it’s best to postpone. Give your loved one enough space to heal, and don’t risk the spread of the disease to your system (as well as the network of people you interact with). healtGet assessed for your health condition. Again, everyone’s bodily constitutions are different. One philosophy for boosting immunity may not work for you as well as it does for someone else. Your point of reference should be your individual health situation, i.e. the record you’ll keep from your personal physician. Seek out advice on what deficiencies you might possess, what types of sickness you might be vulnerable to, and what medicines to take in order to keep you at the peak of health. You may also want to learn first aid in a training course in Sydney or in your Aussie locality so that you can properly deal with any consequences of an immunity problem, such as allergies or asthma.

  7. Enjoy a healthy diet. Food is medicine, as the saying goes. Certain foods go a long way in boosting immunity, and are worth incorporating into your regular diet. Some good examples are citrus fruits (containing Vitamin C, which increases the production of white blood cells and thus counters infection); broccoli (chock-full of fibre, antioxidants, and Vitamins A, C, and E); garlic (helps lower blood pressure); and yoghurt (containing good bacteria that stimulate the immune system). If your doctor also judges you to have a certain vitamin deficiency, then you can also supplement your diet with multivitamins.

  8. Exercise. Regular physical activity instigates better health in myriad ways, such as by lowering blood pressure, maintaining a viable body weight, and bettering the condition of one’s cardiovascular system. But recent studies have also focused on the role of exercise to immune response. One insight courtesy of Harvard Health Publishing is that exercise promotes free and efficient circulation of cells with the immune system. As with all things, however, exercise comes with its own precautions. When you exercise, you should ensure that you are in good enough condition to strain your body, and you should be extra careful not to overexert.

  9. Maintain a healthy sleep regimen. Do you notice that many people who lack sleep seem more vulnerable to getting sick? That should illustrate the close relationship that healthy sleep has to one’s immune system. The average adult will need at least 7 to 8 hours a night of full, uninterrupted rest in order to achieve “restorative sleep,” which keeps the body in fighting form. On your part, try to eliminate all barriers to a good night’s sleep—such as overwork or a distracting environment—and let your body’s immune system recover from its daily stresses.  

  10. Practice good hygiene. Hygiene is crucial in keeping disease-causing microorganisms at bay. The good thing is that it is relatively easy to practice good hygiene if one is mindful. Don’t forget to wash your hands regularly with soap and water, especially in public places where germs are rife (such as hospitals). You may also want to make a regular habit out of disinfecting surfaces in your home.

  11. Be extra careful when in contact with others who are sick. If you’re visiting someone sick in their home or in the hospital, take all the necessary precautions to ensure that the infection won’t spread. Observe visiting hours and wear a protective face mask. In addition, you should only visit if you are confident that you’re in good health; if that’s not the case, then it’s best to postpone. Give your loved one enough space to heal, and don’t risk the spread of the disease to your system (as well as the network of people you interact with).

In sum, boosting one’s immunity to illness is no blanket affair. You need extra sensitivity to your circumstances, as well as those of the people around you; you also need the resolve to sustain healthy habits.

*This article is for informational purposes only and does constitute, replace, or qualify as RPL for our first aid training courses. 

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